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May 2021

Walking shoes and running shoes are designed to accommodate different types of weight distribution, impact, and strides. Walking is a low-impact activity where an individual’s body weight rolls from heel to toe—distributing it evenly throughout the feet. Running is a high-impact activity requiring the body to absorb approximately three times its weight in various parts of the foot, depending on the running style and speed of movement. Walking shoes have a thick outsole and are generally more structured than a running shoe. They offer cushioned midsoles, stability and support for the heel, ankles and calves, and wide toe boxes. Running shoes come in a range of styles to help alleviate the force various running strides put on different areas of the feet. They are typically lighter weight than walking shoes to allow airflow, but provide extra cushioning at the heel and toe. Running shoes also have varying levels of support but are typically more flexible than walking shoes. A podiatrist can suggest walking and running shoes and create custom orthotics that are best suited for an individual’s specific foot structure and needs.

For more information about walking shoes versus running shoes, consult with Dr. Douglas Mckay from New Jersey . Our doctor can measure your feet to determine what your needs are and help you find an appropriate pair of footwear.

Foot Health: The Differences between Walking & Running Shoes

There are great ways to stay in shape: running and walking are two great exercises to a healthy lifestyle. It is important to know that running shoes and walking shoes are not interchangeable. There is a key difference on how the feet hit the ground when someone is running or walking. This is why one should be aware that a shoe is designed differently for each activity.

You may be asking yourself what the real differences are between walking and running shoes and the answers may shock you.

Differences

Walking doesn’t involve as much stress or impact on the feet as running does. However, this doesn’t mean that you should be any less prepared. When you’re walking, you land on your heels and have your foot roll forward. This rolling motion requires additional support to the feet.

Flexibility – Walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles. This allows the walker to push off easily with each step.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Caldwell, and Galloway, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 17 May 2021 00:00

What Causes Cuboid Syndrome?

Cuboid syndrome is a condition in which the cuboid bone, located in the middle of the foot, becomes misaligned. This usually occurs as the result of an acute injury, such as an ankle sprain, or from repetitive impacts from activities like running or dancing. The cuboid bone moves out of its normal position when the ligaments between the cuboid and other bones in the foot are overstretched or torn. If you have this condition, you may feel pain, discomfort, or weakness along the outer edge of the foot. Placing weight on the affected foot may be painful and make standing and walking difficult. You may also notice mild swelling and bruising on the outside and bottom of the foot. If you are experiencing the symptoms of cuboid syndrome, please see a podiatrist for treatment.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Douglas Mckay from New Jersey . Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Caldwell, and Galloway, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Published in Blog
Monday, 10 May 2021 00:00

Can Athlete's Foot Be Prevented?

A skin infection that develops on the foot is often referred to as athlete’s foot. It is caused by a fungus, and can develop into an uncomfortable foot condition. This type of fungus is often found in warm and moist environments, consisting of public swimming pools, shower room floors, and surrounding areas. Common symptoms of athlete’s foot can include redness, itchy skin between the toes and on the sole of the foot, and the skin may become dry and begin to flake. Additionally, it can affect the toenails, which may turn yellow and become thick. It is considered to be contagious, and it is suggested that preventive methods are used while in these types of areas. These can include wearing appropriate shoes, and refraining from sharing towels and socks. If you notice symptoms of athlete’s foot, please consult with a podiatrist who can guide you toward the proper treatment techniques.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Douglas Mckay from New Jersey .  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Caldwell, and Galloway, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about How to Deal with Athlete's Foot
Published in Blog
Monday, 03 May 2021 00:00

What Causes Heel Pain?

Heel pain can have a wide variety of causes, but the location of the pain can help to guide a proper diagnosis. Pain along the bottom of the foot can be caused by plantar fasciitis, heel pad syndrome, plantar warts, calcaneal stress fractures, nerve entrapment, or a neuroma. Pain in the middle of the foot can be due to peroneal tendinopathy, sinus tarsi syndrome, or tarsal tunnel syndrome. Pain in the back of the foot can be caused by Sever’s disease, Achilles tendinopathy, or a Haglund deformity. Seeing a podiatrist is the first step to healing your heel pain. A podiatrist will be able to examine your heel, ask questions about your current symptoms and medical history, and perform the tests necessary to diagnose and treat your heel pain.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr. Douglas Mckay of New Jersey . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Caldwell, and Galloway, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain
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